Get Outside! Elk Rock

It’s the end of summer, folks. We all need a little extra self-care as the season’s getting chillier and darker. Hiking Forest Park, or even Washington Park’s arboretum, can feel daunting. I suggest two much shorter hikes – well, more like walks – that happen to be right across the river from one another.

Elk Rock Island, in Milwaukie, has ample parking, or is a ten minute walk from the Orange Line. Once you’e away from the traffic, however, and crossing the dry river bed that, in wetter months, makes this place an island… you’ll find yourself in another world. A quiet, unpeopled collection of Game-of-Thrones-y crags and rocks that once formed an active volcano. If you take the perimeter, you’ll find a leisurely, unpaved stroll by the water, watching infrequent kayaks pass by. Pack a sandwich (prepare for the lack of restrooms), find a comfortable ledge to sit on, and relax to the sounds of waves lapping gently on the rocks beneath you. If you choose to venture inland, there are a few very short paths through a forest. If you’re lucky, you’ll see bald eagles or other critters.

If you’d like a little more of a walk, head directly across the river, up to the cliff you’ve been staring at from the island. At the cross-streets of Military Ave & Military Lane (right off Riverside Drive) – down a lovely, long lane of old Portland mansions – you’ll find a sign alerting you to The Elk Rock Gardens of the Bishop’s Close. Here you’ll find several gorgeous trails that wind up and down a small hill, through occasional meadows, lily ponds, flower gardens, and more. There are benches for resting or meditating along the way, and no matter the season you visit, a lovely green smell and fresh, not-at-home air.

Peter Kerr spent 60 years on his estate’s huge garden, and when he passed, his daughters gave the land up, on condition that it always be available to the public, free of charge 🌼

The Counselor: Summer 2018

One of my favorite volunteer gigs right now is that I get to edit the quarterly newsletter of Oregon’s chapter of the American Counseling Association. It’s been fun to revamp this small journal’s content to focus on issues surrounding social justice as they relate to the counseling profession in Oregon. And it’s always a huge blast to find and reach out topotential contributors and advertisers, edit content, and manage/do all of the design and layout. If you’re interested in issues affecting this field and this work, check out the summer edition of The Counselor, out today 🙂 

Happy August, Oregon Counselors!

We hope you enjoy our summer issue of The Counselor  with a tall glass of sweet tea, because you deserve good things. After all, you’re a member of this beautiful community of front-line workers, students, and mental health allies.

Because of some amazing writers in our awesome community, this month we’re pleased to share ORCA’s stance on the GOP’s border policies, as well as a really insightful perspective on the recent Morrison Child & Family controversy. We’re also thrilled to learn (and share) some very concrete information around the work Janus Youth is doing to help queer teens (and how we can use Janus as a resource) and a lovely piece on the way providers can be biased around the “morality” of body size and the way that can feel and play out. Finally, please check out Roy Huggins’s primer on “Skype therapy” for tips and tools, as well as a recent letter highlighting COPACT’s recent advocacy work. (And, ORCA members, please pat yourself on the back for supporting COPACT’s work through your ORCA membership dues, you advocacy rockstars!)

In this issue:

ORCA Statement on the “Zero Tolerance” Policy and the Detention of Immigrant Children by Joel Lane, Ph.D, LPC

Separated at the Border: Kids (and Controversy) Come to Portland by Moira Ryan, Editor

Not in My Name by Emma Sohriakoff, LCSW

Intersectionality: LGBQTI Youth & Homelessness by Kimberlee Harrison, MS, GC-C, LPC Intern

FAT: A Call for Radical Acceptance by Haley Tursi Jones, PSU Graduate Student

COPACT Corner: Letter to Dennis Powell by Andrea J. Wright Johnston, COPACT President

How to Get Started with Telemental Health Practice by Roy Huggins, LPC

(You might also want to flip through for a special notice around how you can win one free – absolutely ZERO DOLLAR – admission to ORCA’s next CE training on the subject of trauma. DON’T YOU LIKE PRIZES?????)

Stay cool, y’all! (And read our newsletter!)

Moira Ryan, LPC

Editor, The Counselor

The Counselor: Spring 2018

One of my favorite volunteer gigs right now is that I get to edit the quarterly newsletter of Oregon’s chapter of the American Counseling Association. It’s been fun to revamp this small journal’s content to focus on issues surrounding social justice as they relate to the counseling profession in Oregon. And it’s always a huge blast to find and reach out topotential contributors and advertisers, edit content, and manage/do all of the design and layout. If you’re interested in issues affecting this field and this work, check out the spring edition of The Counselor, out today 🙂 

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Happy May Day, Oregon Counselors and comrades!

We hope you enjoy our spring issue of The Counselor.

A couple months back, we solicited articles for a special issue, Focus On: Grief + End of Life Issues, and we’re grateful that so many of you chose to write to us and share a part of your story. Because of you, this month we’re pleased to share some really insightful perspectives on how grief shapes us as counselors, and how we can work on more effectively help our clients’ as they work through their own experiences with grief and end of life issues.

In this issue:

When Death Makes No Sense by Ronda Gallawa-Foyt, LMHC

Culture and Grieving “Well” by Eliza Alvarez McBride, grad student

No Platitudes, Please by Kris Fant, LPC, LMHC

PD&E Update: “Death, Dying & Grief” by Gianna Russo-Mitma, MS, LMFT

Grieving Gendered Selves by Sasha Strong, PhD (cand.), LPC Intern

An Invitation to Question: Worldview & Death by Tamara Webb, LPC, LMHC

Death with Dignity: Clinical Input into Capacity Evaluations by Harry C. Dudley, PsyD

COPACT Corner: Our 2018 Legislative Season by Andrea J. Wright Johnston, LMFT

Editorial: March for Our Lives by Moira Ryan, LPC

Resource Highlight: SAGE Metro Portland

Happy reading!

Moira Ryan, LPC

Editor, The Counselor

The Counselor: Winter 2018

One of my favorite volunteer gigs right now is that I get to edit the quarterly newsletter of Oregon’s chapter of the American Counseling Association. It’s been fun to revamp this small journal’s content to focus on issues surrounding social justice as they relate to the counseling profession in Oregon. And it’s always a huge blast to find and reach out topotential contributors and advertisers, edit content, and manage/do all of the design and layout. If you’re interested in issues affecting this field and this work, check out the winter edition of The Counselor, out today 🙂 

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Happy February, Oregon Counselors!

We hope you enjoy our winter issue of The Counselor.

A couple months back, we solicited articles for a special issue, Focus On: Effective Advocacy Approaches, and we’re grateful that so many of you chose to write to us and share a part of your story. Because of you, this month we’re pleased to share some really insightful perspectives on clinical strategies for work with particular populations.

In this issue:

A Full Circle: Thoughts on Effective Work with Refugees by Kalindi Kapadia, LPC

Advocacy & Confidentiality by Aaron Good, LPC Intern

The “You Poor Thing” Voice: How to Change Your Tone by Jana DeCristofaro, LCSW

Adjunct Treatment: Trauma-Informed Yoga? by Harry Dudley, PsyD

Concrete Strategies for Creating Healthy, Assertive Youth by Gianna Russo-Mitma, LMFT

How to Best Serve Those Who Served by Bill Maier, LCSW

Don’t Take It for Granted by Larry Conner, LPC

and more!

Hope you’re enjoying the rain – and hey, thanks again for following us on Facebook for info on our work, contests, and outreach; thanks for helping us pass Measure 101; thanks for the incredible interest in our upcoming professional development event; and, moreover, thanks so much for being a part of our terrific community 🙂

Moira Ryan, LPC

Editor, The Counselor

The Counselor: Fall 2017

One of my favorite volunteer gigs right now is that I get to edit the quarterly newsletter of Oregon’s chapter of the American Counseling Association. It’s been fun to revamp this small journal’s content to focus on issues surrounding social justice as they relate to the counseling profession in Oregon. And it’s always a huge blast to find and reach out topotential contributors and advertisers, edit content, and manage/do all of the design and layout. If you’re interested in issues affecting this field and this work, check out the fall edition of The Counselor, out today 🙂 

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Happy November, Oregon Counselors!

We hope you enjoy our fall issue of The Counselor.

A couple months back, we solicited articles for a special issue, Focus On: Intersectionality, and we’re grateful that so many of you chose to write to us and share a part of your story. Because of you, this month we’re pleased to share some really insightful perspectives on how privilege plays out in a session, how it affects our field, and some simple things we can do to help ourselves, our colleagues, and our clients feel seen, heard, and valued.

In this issue:

Making It Visible by Raina Hassan, LPC

All Perpetrators, All Victims by Victor Chang, Ph.D, LPC

Weight-Inclusive Care by Hilary Kinavey, LPC

It’s Intimidating and Important… So Let’s Talk About It by Gianna Russo-Mitma, MS, LMFT

Between Worlds and Identities by Neil Panchmatia

COPACT Corner: SB 860: What Does It Mean? by Larry Conner, LPC

OACES Corner: Changing Campus Climate by Joel Lane, LPC, Ph.D

2017 ORCA Power + Privilege Essay Award Winners’ Essays!

Counseling the Person with Legal Blindness by Deb Marinos, CRC, LPC Intern

Veterans Have Their Own Culture by Rev. Shane Nelson

And if you haven’t had a chance to check out our summer issue, you might want to check that out – especially to read Summer Brown’s thoughtful essay on counseling and intersectionality. (We’re so excited to see her keynote at this week’s ORCA conference!)

Hope you’re enjoying the change of seasons, and hope to see you at the conference 🙂

Moira Ryan, LPC

Editor, The Counselor

The Counselor: Summer 2017

One of my favorite volunteer gigs right now is that I get to edit the quarterly newsletter of Oregon’s chapter of the American Counseling Association. It’s been fun to revamp this small journal’s content to focus on issues surrounding social justice as they relate to the counseling profession in Oregon. And it’s always a huge blast to find and reach out to potential contributors and advertisers, edit content, and manage/do all of the design and layout. If you’re interested in issues affecting this field and this work, check out the summer edition of The Counselor, out today 🙂 

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Happy August, Oregon Counselors!

We hope you enjoy our summer issue of The Counselor.

A couple months back, we solicited articles for a special issue Focus On: Diversity + Inclusion, and we’re grateful that so many of you chose to write to us and share a part of your story. Because of you, this month we’re pleased to share some really insightful perspectives on what othering feels like – and some simple things we can do to help ourselves, our colleagues, and our clients feel seen, heard, and valued. Thanks especially to Summer Brown (ORCA’s 2017 Conference keynote speaker), whose article “Between Transparancy & Awareness” is funny, frank, and a real must-read.

In addition, our Summer issue invites you to 1) join us in starting Oregon’s first ALGBTIC chapter, 2) learn more about the many, MANY ways our lobbyist (paid for by your membership dues!) and the COPACT team have been championing Oregon counselors this legislative season, 3) think more critically about granting access to records, 4) meet your new representatives, one of whom is just back from advocating for us in D.C., and 5) print out a handy-dandy list of social justice primers for your next trip to Powell’s.

Thanks for reading! And hope to see you at the ORCA picnic this weekend 🙂

Moira Ryan, LPC

Editor, The Counselor

Local Resource: William Temple House

Since 2013, I’ve been proud to volunteer at William Temple House. It’s one of the last social service agencies that never asks its patrons for proof of income, long wait times, or prayer before receiving services. The “castle” itself – called Mackenzie House – is a wonderful space full of hidden crevices, creaky turrets, and other Victorian flourishes that never add up to a “church basement feeling.” Its food pantry is one of the best in Portland, allowing folks to truly shop for fresh vegetables, milk, and meat along canned items. Its counseling department is one of the most well-respected in the area: most folks, dependent on OHP or Kaiser, might be able to access counseling once a month by burned-out new graduates with huge caseloads, whereas at William Temple House you’re afforded access to weekly treatment by excellent providers who are supported by free weekly trainings and supervision.

If you’re in need of a hand up – and we all are, from time to time – please consider visiting this amazing organization. If you’re looking for a worthy place for which to offer your time or donations, again, please consider William Temple House.